Endangered species repository

Elephant tusks, leopard heads, crocodile skin purses and tiger skins — more than 1.5 million items in all — fill the shelves of a warehouse on a wildlife refuge near Denver.

The National Wildlife Property Repository is the only place in the United States that stores such a large collection of seized wildlife items. It provides a macabre look at the cost of the global trafficking of endangered and threatened animals.

The contents of the Colorado center operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Office of Law Enforcement include an array of animal parts, large and small, and the items made from them — skins, carved ivory, boots, even medicines.

The confiscated items come from law enforcement agencies around the country.

"You can think of us as customs for wildlife," said Coleen Schaefer, who supervises the repository.

A multibillion-dollar industry, the black market in wildlife is the fourth most profitable in the world, after illegal trafficking in weapons, drugs and humans, Schaefer said.

The repository has a loan program for schools, museums and nonprofits that have a conservation message. It also sends items to research institutions.

"Our main purpose is to provide conservation education about the legal and illegal wildlife trade," Schaefer said.

Nearby is the National Eagle Repository, also a one-of-a-kind facility in the U.S. that stores dead bald and golden eagles and their parts and feathers. Alaska Natives and Native Americans in federally recognized tribes may use the feathers for religious purposes.

Use of the center's feathers reduces pressure to take eagles from the wild, the Fish and Wildlife Service says.


 

See more photos

 

Text from the AP news story, AP PHOTOS: Repository brims with seized wildlife items

 

Associated Press photographers and photo editors on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ap/lists/ap-photographers

 

Spotlight is the blog of AP Images, the world’s largest collection of historical and contemporary photos. AP Images provides instant access to AP’s iconic photos and adds new content every minute of every day from every corner of the world, making it an essential source of photos and graphics for professional image buyers and commercial customers.  Whether your needs are for editorial, commercial, or personal use, AP Images has the content and the expert sales team to fulfill your image requirements. Visit apimages.com to learn more.

 

 

Written content on this site is not created by the editorial department of AP, unless otherwise noted. 

 

 

AP Images on Twitter | AP Images on Facebook | AP Images on Instagram

 

 

 

Nat Castañeda is an interdisciplinary visual artist based in Brooklyn, New York. A California native, Castañeda works primarily in video and collage, with an emphasis on tactile intimacy with her materials remaining an important aspect of all her projects. Common issues in Castañeda’s work are the conflating of iconography and pornography, the questioning of traditional gender binaries, and the role of technology within personal narratives. She received her MFA from the School of Visual Arts and has shown at venues such as El Museo del Barrio and Electronic Arts Intermix. In addition to her art practice, Castañeda currently works at The Associated Press where she leads a team that curates AP's online archive of historic and contemporary photojournalism. Castañeda’s photography has appeared in the New York Times,U.S. News & World Report and USA Today.