Nigerian girls kidnapped

Nigerian girls kidnapped

Scores of protesters chanting “Bring Back Our Girls” marched Thursday, May 22, 2014,  to Nigeria’s presidential villa to demand more action to free nearly 300 schoolgirls abducted by Islamic militants, but President Goodluck Jonathan did not meet with them, leaving a proxy to deliver a lecture that further angered the demonstrators. 


The protesters complained of the insensitivity of Jonathan, who did not even met some of the parents of abducted children, who came to Nigeria’s capital specially to see him earlier this month. Many schools across the country also closed Thursday to protest the abductions, the government’s failure to rescue them and the killings of scores of teachers by Islamic extremists in recent years.
 


In this photo taken Monday, May 19, 2014, Solome Ishaya, sister of kidnapped school girls Hauwa Ishaya stands outside their family house in Chibok, Nigeria. More than 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from a school in Chibok in Nigeria's north-eastern state of Borno on April 14. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the act. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

In this photo taken Sunday, May 18, 2014, Joy Bishara, left, and Hadiza Fali, centre, two of the school girls that escaped being kidnapped by Islamist extremists by jumping off a truck, are photographed on a motor taxi outside her school, in Chibok, Nigeria. More than 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from a school in Chibok in Nigeria's north-eastern state of Borno on April 14. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the act. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

South Africans protest in solidarity against the abduction three weeks ago of hundreds of schoolgirls in Nigeria by the Muslim extremist group Boko Haram and what protesters said was the failure of the Nigerian government and international community to rescue them, during a march to the Nigerian Consulate in Johannesburg, South Africa Thursday, May 8, 2014. The kidnapping has ignited a viral social media campaign that has brought renewed attention to Boko Haram's campaign of violence, and protests around the world. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Nigerian student Caleb Udeoha writes out a placard in support of the campaign for the release of the kidnapped girls in Nigeria, outside Westminster Cathedral in London , Saturday, May 10, 2014. Global outrage against the abduction of more than 200 Nigerian girls by Islamist militant sect Boko Haram as a social media campaign drew worldwide support. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

In this photo taken on Monday, May 19, 2014. Martha Mark, the mother of kidnapped school girl Monica Mark cries as she display her photo, in the family house, in Chibok, Nigeria. More than 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from a school in Chibok in Nigeria's north-eastern state of Borno on April 14. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the act. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

South Africans protest in solidarity against the abduction three weeks ago of hundreds of schoolgirls in Nigeria by the Muslim extremist group Boko Haram and what protesters said was the failure of the Nigerian government and international community to rescue them, during a march to the Nigerian Consulate in Johannesburg, South Africa Thursday, May 8, 2014. The kidnapping has ignited a viral social media campaign that has brought renewed attention to Boko Haram's campaign of violence, and protests around the world. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

People light candles during a vigil to mark one month after the girls of government secondary school Chibok were kidnapped, in Abuja, Nigeria, Wednesday, May 14, 2014. Nigeria's government is ruling out an exchange of more than 270 kidnapped schoolgirls for detained Islamic militants, Britain's top official for Africa said Wednesday. Boko Haram abducted more than 300 schoolgirls from the school in Chibok in the northeastern state of Borno on April 15. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

South African school children and religious leaders take part in a silent protest in support of the kidnapped school girls from Chibok Secondary school in Abuja, Nigeria, that were abducted a month ago, in Cape Town, South Africa, Friday, May 16, 2014. Amid apparent security concerns, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan has cancelled a trip to the traumatized town from which Islamic extremists abducted more than 300 schoolgirls a month ago. Two officials in the presidency confirmed the cancellation on Friday. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

In this photo taken Sunday, May 18, 2014, Joy Bishara, one of the school girls that escaped being kidnapped by Islamist extremists by jumping off a truck, is photographed outside her home, in Chibok, Nigeria. More than 200 schoolgirls were kidnapped from a school in Chibok in Nigeria's north-eastern state of Borno on April 14. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the act. (AP Photo/Sunday Alamba)

 

Text from AP Story NIGERIAN SCHOOLS CLOSE TO PROTEST KIDNAPPINGS BY ANDREW DRAKE.

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